Sale!

CS 143 – Written Assignment 2

$30.00

Category:

Description

Rate this product

CS 143  – Written Assignment 2

This assignment covers context free grammars and parsing. You may discuss this assignment with
other students and work on the problems together. However, your write-up should be your own
individual work, and you should indicate in your submission who you worked with, if applicable.
Assignments can be submitted electronically through Gradescope as a PDF by 11:59 PM PDT. A
LATEX template for writing your solutions is available on the course website.
1. Give the context-free grammar (CFG) for each of the following languages. Any grammar is
acceptable – including ambiguous grammars – as long as it has the correct language.
(a) The set of all strings over the alphabet {2, −, +} representing valid arithmetic expressions
where each integer in the expression is a single digit and the expression evaluates to some
value ≥ 0.
Example Strings in the Language:
2+2 2-2+2 -2-2+2+2
Strings not in the Language:
+2 -2 -2+22 2++2-2 
(b) The set of all strings over the alphabet {string| |%s|arg|”|, } representing valid arguments to the c printf() function. For the purposes of this problem, treat string and
arg as tokens of your language where string represents an arbitrary length sequence of
characters [A-Z][a-z] and arg represents any arbitrary char*. printf() replaces each %s
with the contents of arg. For instance, printf(”Test %s %s”, foo, bar) will print ”Test
(contents of foo) (contents of bar)”. See the c printf() documentation for further detail.
Although printf() ignores unused args, your grammar should produce strings with an
equal number of %s and arg tokens. Note that ’,’ and ’ ’ are in the alphabet.
Example Strings in the Language (surrounded by printf() for clarity, do not inclue
printf() in the grammar):
printf( ”” ) printf(”string %s%s”, arg, arg)
printf(” %s stringstring ” , arg )
Strings not in the Language (surrounded by printf() for clarity, do not inclue printf() in
the grammar):
printf(”%s”) printf(”arg string”) printf(string %s, arg)
(c) The set of all strings over the alphabet {0, 1} in the language L : {0
i1
j0
k
| j ≤ i + k}.
Example Strings in the Language:
00000 000111100 
Strings not in the Language:
1 000111101
1
(d) The set of all strings over the alphabet {[, ], {, }, , } which are sets. We define a set to be a
collection of zero or more comma-separated arrays enclosed in an open brace and a close
brace. Similarly, we define an array to be a collection of zero or more comma-separated
sets enclosed in an open bracket and a close bracket. Note that ”,” is in the alphabet.
Example Arrays:
[{}, {}] [] [{[], []}]
Example Sets:
{[]} {} {[{}], []}
Example Strings in the Language:
{} {[], [{[]}]} {[{}, {}, {}], []}
Strings not in the Language:
[] {{}} {[[]]}
2. (a) Left factor the following grammar:
S → I | I − J | I + K
I → (J − K) | (J)
J → K1 | K2
K → K3 | 
(b) Eliminate left recursion from the following grammar:
S → ST S | ST | T
T → T a | T b | U
U → T | c
3. Consider the following CFG, where the set of terminals is {a, b, #, %, !}:
S → %aT | U!
T → aS | baT | 
U → #aT U | 
(a) Construct the FIRST sets for each of the nonterminals.
(b) Construct the FOLLOW sets for each of the nonterminals.
(c) Construct the LL(1) parsing table for the grammar.
(d) Show the sequence of stack, input and action configurations that occur during an LL(1)
parse of the string “#abaa%aba!”. At the beginning of the parse, the stack should
contain a single S.
4. What advantage does left recursion have over right recursion in shift-reduce parsing?
Hint: Consider left and right recursive grammars for the language a*. What happens if your
input has a million a’s?
2
5. Consider the Following Grammar G over the alphabet Σ = {a, b, c}:
S
0 → S
S → Aa
S → Bb
A → Ac
A → 
B → Bc
B → 
You want to implement G using an SLR(1) parser (note that we have already added the S’
→ S production for you).
(a) Construct the first state of the LR(0) machine, compute the FOLLOW sets of A and B,
and point out the conflicts that prevent the grammar from being SLR(1)
(b) Show modifications to production 4 (A → Ac) and production 6 (B → Bc) that make the
grammar SLR(1) while having the same language as the original grammar G. Explain
the intuition behind this result.
3