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CS1026A Computer Organization Assignment 1 

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CS1026A Computer Organization
Assignment 1
General Instructions: This assignment consists of 4 pages, 1 exercise, and is marked out
of 100. Assignments are the independent work of each student. Software may be used to
detect cheating.
Non-Functional Code Instructions:
1. Include brief comments in your code. Identifying yourself (the code’s author) by name
and user ID in the initial comment header. Comment also on key instructions and
calculations in your code.
e.g. ##
# A program for computing areas with inscribed circles.
# Student Name: Alex Brandt
# Student ID: abrandt5
2. Follow good coding style and normal Python conventions. This includes, but is not
limited to:
(i) Meaningful variable names.
(ii) Conventions for naming variables and constants.
(iii) Use of constants over “magic numbers”.
(iv) Readability: indentation, appropriate white space (blank spaces) within instructions, consistency in the use of all of the above.
Evaluation:
1. Functional Requirements:
(i) Does your program correctly implement an algorithm for solving the problem?
(ii) Does your program behave according to the specifications?
(iii) Does your program handle invalid input?
(iv) Does your program output values according to the specifications?
2. Non-Functional Requirements (above).
3. Ability to follow directions precisely.
Submission Instructions: Your submission should include exactly two files (zipped into a
zip file, if you’d like). These two files are: userid_Assign1.py and userid_Assign1.pdf; where
userid is replaced by your UWO User ID (everything preceding “@” in your UWO email; e.g.
abrandt5). Your python file contains the code which implements the algorithm for solving
the following problem. Your PDF file contains the written portion of the following problem.
Use proper English, spelling, and grammar. If the person correcting your assignment is
unable to easily read or interpret your answer then it may be marked as incorrect without
the possibility of remarking.
1
Problem 1. This problem deals with inscribed circles. An inscribed circle is a circle which
fits maximally (with respect to area) inside another shape. In this problem we are interested
in circles inscribed within squares and triangles. Figure 1 shows a circle inscribed inside of a
square. Figure 2 shows a circle inscribed inside of a triangle. In this problem you must devise
an algorithm (try not to google it!) for determining the area of the square (resp. triangle)
excluding the area of the inscribed circle. That is, the coloured regions in each figure (the
blue region in Figure 1 and the green region in Figure 2). Let us call the algorithm which
computes areas with respect to the square the “square algorithm”. Let us call the algorithm
which computes areas with respect to the triangle the “triangle algorithm”.

Figure 1: A circle inscribed inside of a
square.
𝑂
𝐴
𝐵
𝐶
𝑐
𝑎
𝑏
Figure 2: A circle inscribed inside of a
triangle.
The written portion of this assignment is to define pseudo-code for each of those algorithms.
1. The square algorithm takes as input the side length ℓ of the square.
2. The triangle algorithm takes as input the 3 pairs of numbers (𝑥𝐴, 𝑦𝐴), (𝑥𝐵, 𝑦𝐵), (𝑥𝐶, 𝑦𝐶)
which define the Cartesian coordinates of the vertices of the triangle.
3. Your algorithm and subsequent program only needs to handle non-negative
integer inputs.
4. In your pseudo-code work generically with variables and not instances of the problem.
The programming portion of this assignment is to implement both algorithms within the
same program. To facilitate this consider the following functional specifications for your
program.
1. The program should begin by prompting the user with the question “Is your circle
inscribed in a square or a triangle?” and receiving some string as input.
2. If the user responds with “s”, “S”, “square”, “Square”, or any combination of uppercase
and lowercase letters which spell the word “square”, then your program computes the
“square algorithm”.
2
3. If the user responds with “t”, “T”, “triangle”, “Triangle”, or any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters which spell the word “triangle”, then your program computes
the “triangle algorithm”.
4. If the user’s input does not match any of the previous two cases then your program should print “Sorry, your input was: <input>. This program accepts
one of “square” or “triangle”” where <input> is replaced by the actual input of
the user. The program should then terminate without computing anything.
5. For the square algorithm:
(a) The program should then prompt the user with “The square’s side length: ” and
then receive as input a positive integer which is the square’s side length.
(b) Compute and print the area of the inscribed circle to a precision of 3 digits after
the decimal place. Include a meaningful message describing what the value is (e.g.
The area of the inscribed circle is: 23.345).
(c) Compute and print the area of the square excluding the area of the inscribed
circle (i.e. the blue shaded region) to a precision of 3 digits after the decimal
place. Include a meaningful message describing what the value is.
6. For the triangle algorithm:
(a) The problem should prompt the user with some meaningful text to enter the 3
coordinates (6 non-negative integer numbers in total) which are the coordinates
of the vertices of the triangle. How you prompt the user and how you get these 6
values is up to you.
(b) Compute and print the coordinates of the center of the inscribed circle to a precision of 2 digits after the decimal place. Include a meaningful message describing
what the value is.
(c) Compute and print the area of the inscribed circle to a precision of 4 digits after
the decimal place. Include a meaningful message describing what the value is.
(d) Compute and print the area of the triangle to a precision of 4 digits after the
decimal place. Include a meaningful message describing what the value is.
(e) Compute and print the area of the triangle excluding the area of the inscribed
circle (i.e. the green shaded region) to a precision of 3 digits after the decimal
place. Include a meaningful message describing what the value is.
7. If, at any time, the user inputs a non-number where a number is expected, the program
should output “Sorry, <input> was not a number.” where <input> is replaced by
the actual input of the user.
Some useful information.
• To test if a string is an integer you can use the isnumeric() method.
isANumber = “245”.isnumeric()
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• The distance 𝑑 between two Cartesian points 𝑝1 = (𝑥1, 𝑦1) and 𝑝2 = (𝑥2, 𝑦2) is
𝑑 =
⌈︂
(𝑥1 − 𝑥2)
2 + (𝑦1 − 𝑦2)
2
• The area of a circle with radius 𝑟 is
𝐴𝑟𝑒𝑎 = 𝜋𝑟2
• The area of a triangle with side lengths 𝑎, 𝑏, 𝑐 is
𝐴𝑟𝑒𝑎 =
⌈︂
𝑠(𝑠 − 𝑎)(𝑠 − 𝑏)(𝑠 − 𝑐), 𝑠 =
(𝑎 + 𝑏 + 𝑐)
2
• Given the Cartesian coordinates of a triangle’s vertices 𝐴 = (𝑥𝐴, 𝑦𝐴), 𝐵 = (𝑥𝐵, 𝑦𝐵), 𝐶 =
(𝑥𝐶, 𝑦𝐶), the center of the triangle’s inscribed circle is 𝑂 = (𝑥𝑂, 𝑦𝑂),
𝑥𝑂 =
(𝑎𝑥𝐴 + 𝑏𝑥𝐵 + 𝑐𝑥𝐵)
𝑝
, 𝑦𝑂 =
(𝑎𝑦𝐴 + 𝑏𝑦𝐵 + 𝑐𝑦𝐶)
𝑝
where 𝑝 is the triangle’s perimeter 𝑝 = 𝑎 + 𝑏 + 𝑐. Note that side 𝑎 is opposite vertex 𝐴;
similarly for 𝑏 and 𝑐 (see Figure 2).
• The radius 𝑟 of a circle inscribed in a triangle with side lengths 𝑎, 𝑏, 𝑐 is
𝑟 =
⌈︂
𝑠(𝑠 − 𝑎)(𝑠 − 𝑏)(𝑠 − 𝑐)
𝑠
, 𝑠 =
(𝑎 + 𝑏 + 𝑐)
2
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