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Homework 4: Boarder Song

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Homework 4:
Boarder Song

Assignment
In this lab you will design and implement a simple C++ class for representing a position on a rectangular
game board. You will use this class in your Project 2 implementation next week.
Your Homework 3 and Project 1 both use integers to represent the position of a player’s move, re?ecting the
reality that we use 2D arrays to represent board states… but a position on a board is a type of data which
should really be modeled as a class BoardPosition. We can then write methods like ApplyMove which take
BoardPosition objects representing where the user wants to go, rather than simple int values (which don’t
carry the same semantic context as a name like BoardPosition). Using primitive data types in the place
of proper objects is something we call a ?bad code smell? in software engineering ? this particular ?smell? is
called primitive obsession.
The BoardPosition class will be immutable: once we make a BoardPosition object, it cannot be changed.
You will write several operators and member methods that will make manipulating these objects easier than
would be possible in a language like Java.
Design
Write a class BoardPosition according to the following speci?cation:
1. Instance variables of type char to represent the row and column of the position.
2. A public default constructor, setting row and column to 0.
3. A public constructor taking a row and column as parameters, and initializing the instance variables to
those values.
4. Inline, const accessors/getters for the row and column instance variables, but no mutators/setters.
5. These operators:
(a) operator std::string() const, which converts the position into a string of the format (r, c).
Hint: ostringstream, or std::to_string.
(b) Global std::ostream& operator<?<(std::ostream &lhs, BoardPosition rhs): prints the string
form of rhs to the lhs stream. (Pop quiz: why is this parameter not accepted as a const reference?)
(c) Friend std::istream& operator?(std::istream &lhs, BoardPosition& rhs): assume the
user has entered a string of the form (r, c); extract the row and column from that string and
set the row and column instance variables of rhs accordingly. Be sure to ?read? the ) character
from the istream (don’t be rude and leave it behind).4
(d) bool operator==(BoardPosition rhs): two positions are equal if they have the same row and
column.
(e) bool operator<(BoardPosition rhs): position a is less than position b if and only if a’s row
is less than b’s row, or if their rows are equal, then a’s column is less than b’s column.
6. These member methods:
(a) bool InBounds(int boardSize): returns true if this position’s row and column are in the bounds
of a board of the given size. Assume the board’s valid coordinates go from 0 up to boardSize-1.
(b) bool InBounds(int rows, int columns): same as above, except don’t assume the board is
square.
1
(c) static std::vector<BoardPosition GetRectangularPositions(int rows, int columns): this
method generates and returns a vector of BoardPositions, one object in the vector for each position on a board of size rows x columns, in row-major order. For example, if rows is 3 and
columns is 2, this method returns a vector containing the positions (0, 0) (0, 1) (1, 0) (1,
1) (2, 0) (2, 1) in that order. (Note that this is also in increasing order, according to the
rules for operator< written above.)
BoardDirection Class
Next, create a class to represent a 1-square movement in some direction on a game board, called BoardDirection.
A direction consists of a ?row change? and ?column change?, indicating the amount to change a row and column position by in order to move 1 square in the given direction. Create:
1. Instance variables of type char to represent the row direction and column changes.
2. A public default constructor, setting both changes to 0.
3. A public constructor taking a row change and column change as parameters, and initializing the
instance variables to those values.
4. Inline, const accessors/getters for the row change and column change instance variables, but no
mutators/setters.
5. A public, static variable CARDINAL_DIRECTIONS, which is an std::array<BoardDirection, 8 containing 8 direction objects for the 8 ?cardinal directions?. (Up-left, up, up-right, …)
Now go back to your BoardPosition class and add one ?nal operator:
1. BoardPosition operator+(BoardDirection dir): returns the position arrived at after moving a
single square in the given direction.
Testing Your Code
You should write a main function to test your code, rather than assume it’s correct from the moment you
type it. Create variables of your two types and call the operators and methods you have written. Use your
<?< operator to check your work.
Deliverables
Hand in:
1. A printed copy of your code, printed from Visual Studio or your IDE. Print all .h and .cpp
?les.
2. Note: your code must declare exactly the methods described in this spec, and nothing more.
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