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HW3: Random Testing Hands On

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HW3: Random Testing Hands On
Points 25 Submitting a file upload File Types pdf

Start Assignment
Motivation
This week we discussed how random testing can help find pesky bugs that other
approaches are likely to miss. The goal of this assignment is twofold:
1. Practice writing random tests
2. Practice trying to diagnose the cause of the discovered bugs
You will write a test suite that uses random testing to try to find bugs, but more importantly, you will
need to theorize why each bug is triggered.
Course Learning Outcome(s):
Apply testing techniques, including black-box and white-box techniques, automatic testing
activities, and regression testing (CLO 4)
Module Learning Outcome(s):
Apply random testing techniques
Description
If you recall, random testing is a form of black box testing, so you will have to write tests based on a
specification. Luckily, we are going to reuse the same specification from Week 3’s assignment. You will
be testing again, credit_card_validator . The specification is reproduced below.
You will test a function called credit_card_validator that is passed a sequence of digits as
a string that represents a credit card number. This function will return True if it is a valid credit card
number, otherwise, it will return False .
Depending on the credit card issuer, the length of a credit card number can range between 10 and 19
digits. The first few digits of the number are the issuer prefix. Each credit card issuer has an assigned
range of numbers. For example, only Visa credit card numbers may begin with 4 , while American
Express card numbers must begin with either a 34 or 37 . Sometimes, credit card providers are
assigned multiple ranges. For example, MasterCard card numbers must start with the numbers
between 51 through 55 or 2221 through 2720 (inclusive).
The last digit of the number is referred to as the check digit and acts as a checksum. Most credit cards
calculate this check digit using the Luhn algorithm (see resources below for how this is calculated).
In order to limit the scope of this assignment, we are going to limit the number of credit card issuers to
3: Visa, MasterCard, and American Express. Each has its own prefixes and length requirements.
Visa
Prefix(es): 4
Length: 16
MasterCard
Prefix(es): 51 through 55 and 2221 through 2720
Length: 16
American Express
Prefix(es): 34 and 37
Length: 15
Your task is to create a series of tests that attempt to reveal bugs in the implementation. As random
testing is a form of black box testing, you will not have access to the source.
You will be submitting your code to Gradescope, which will autograde your tests. In order to get full
credit on the assignment, you will need to locate all 8 bugs in the code (refer to the rubric for full
details).
Considering that our tests will stop running as soon as one of its asserts fails, for this assignment,
please DO NOT use asserts. It is sufficient to just call credit_card_validator with your test cases;
Gradescope will still catch the bugs. We will just assume that your tests have the correct assert.
This assignment is a bit different than Week 3’s. There you just submitted a testing suite on
Gradescope, this week you will also be submitting a PDF where you try to theorize as to the cause of
each of the 8 bugs. Please use the supplied Word document
(https://canvas.oregonstate.edu/courses/1923080/files/100064306/download?wrap=1) to format your PDF.
Below is an example of how to fill out the document. Notice you will need to provide evidence and
a theory for each bug.
Bug 1
Triggering credit card numbers (at least 5)
123456782
133549798
187456314
154897466
123545668
Theory that explains what triggered the bug
This bug is caused by credit card numbers that begin with 1 , have 9 digits, and both valid
and invalid check bits.
It is important that your theory fits your supplied triggering numbers to receive any credit. For example,
a theory of “This bug is caused by credit card numbers that begin with 12 ” would not fit the supplied
evidence. To receive full credit for each bug, your theory must match the actual coded error in the
source. This means you would be wise to gather as much evidence as possible for each bug to ensure
your theory holds true across all triggering numbers. It is important to be as specific as possible about
the patterns you observe in your theories (i.e. prefixes, length, checkbit, etc.). Also, please do not pad
your PDF with numbers that don’t trigger a given bug , we will be verifying.
Finally, your test suite needs to be free of linting errors using the PEP8 standard; this will be important
later when working on shared repositories. If you are unfamiliar with linting, please see the resources
below. The easiest way to accomplish this is to ensure that there are no “squiggly” lines under your
code in PyCharm. You can also use the PEP8 Online tool below to copy and paste your code to verify
it has no errors.
Please see the Rubric for the exact point breakdown and deductions.
Do Tests Have to be Random?
It may seem odd to state this, but your tests MUST be random. You may not have tests that have
hardcoded credit card numbers in them. Also, you need to make sure your tests are random enough.
To put this in a quantifiable way, the longest prefix listed above is 4 digits so you may not have more
than 4 digits of a number hardcoded into any given random test generator for a prefix. Failure to have
random tests will result in a 50% deduction from your score.
Please note it says prefix. So if the prefix for a given type of credit card is only 1 digit (e.g., Visa), then
you can’t hard code in 4 digits (or 2 or 3) as the prefix for that test case: Visa’s prefix is only 1 digit
long.
You also cannot hard code numbers at the end or in the middle. If you discover some bugs are
triggered by a given sequence of numbers, do not hard code those in as then they are no longer
random.
Finally, your tests need to catch all the bugs during a single run. We will be rerunning your latest
submission to grade and you will only receive points for those bugs that are triggered.
Developing solid theories
For this assignment, you are being asked to develop theories that explain what all the triggering test
cases have in common for each bug. For HW1: Black Box Testing, it was fairly easy to identify these
theories if you used a Partition Testing approach: Bug 1 is triggered by credit card numbers that begin
with a MasterCard prefix, are 16 digits long, and have a valid check digit (not the actual bug in the
assignment).
Random Testing Hands On
This time around, things are not so obvious, because these bugs seem to appear at random (see what
I did there?). It is important to gather as many examples (not just the 5 in the PDF) to have a solid
data set to base our theories on. If you look at the Rubric below, you will see that to receive full points
on this assignment, you need to not only develop a theory that fits the test cases in the PDF, but
matches the actual cause of each bug (thus, the need for as much data points as possible).
To help get you into the correct state of mind to theorize effectively, please review the following
pointers.
1. You should view these numbers as credit card numbers, just like you did in HW1
2. After you have exhausted #1, stop thinking of them as credit card numbers
3. What do all the triggering test cases have in common when it comes to being actual integers?
4. What do all the triggering test cases have in common when it comes to patterns that appear within
the numbers?
Hints
It is best to think about this assignment as you trying to identify test cases that cause crashes, not
bugs that result in incorrect output. Therefore, don’t worry about asserting; just call the functionunder-test ( credit_card_validator ).
Finding the bugs is fairly trivial and could be done with just a single test case, but this risks running
over the time limit
Each time you trigger a bug, Gradescope will print the triggering numbers in the autograde report
You need to trigger each bug at least once per run. There is no need to trigger it 5 times per run.
The main focus of this assignment is to diagnose the bugs. To do this, you will require many data
points. Some of the bugs are less common than others. It is OK to rerun your tests on Gradescope
multiple times to gather these triggering numbers
You may run over the time limit while gathering data, but just make sure your tests run within the
time limit in your final submission to Gradescope
What to turn in
Submit to Gradescope your testing suite; it must be named tests.py
Submit to Canvas your PDF following the supplied template
‘tests.py’ must be free of PEP8 linting errors
Tests must run within 25 seconds on Gradescope. See Gradescope results for your test runtime.
Resources
PDF Template (https://canvas.oregonstate.edu/courses/1923080/files/100064306/download?wrap=1)
Criteria Ratings Pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
Bug 1 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 2 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 3 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 4 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 5 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 6 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 7 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
Bug 8 Found 1 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
PDF – Bug 1 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 1 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
matches the true
cause of the error
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
NOT the true
cause
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
Criteria Ratings Pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
PDF – Bug 2 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 2 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
matches the true
cause of the error
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
NOT the true
cause
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
PDF – Bug 3 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 3 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
matches the true
cause of the error
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
NOT the true
cause
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
PDF – Bug 4 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 4 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
Criteria Ratings Pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
matches the true
cause of the error
NOT the true
cause
PDF – Bug 5 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 5 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
matches the true
cause of the error
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
NOT the true
cause
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
PDF – Bug 6 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 6 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
matches the true
cause of the error
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
NOT the true
cause
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
PDF – Bug 7 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 7 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
Criteria Ratings Pts
1 pts
1 pts
1 pts
0 pts
0 pts
matches the true
cause of the error
NOT the true
cause
the evidence
PDF – Bug 8 – Triggering numbers 1 pts
Full Marks
Has 5 valid triggering
numbers
0 pts
No Marks
Fewer than 5 valid triggering
numbers
PDF – Bug 8 – Theory 1 pts
Full Marks
Theory fits the
evidence AND
matches the true
cause of the error
0.5 pts
Half Marks
Theory fits the
evidence but
NOT the true
cause
0 pts
No Marks
No theory or the
theory doesn’t fit
the evidence
tests.py is free of linting errors 1 pts
Full Marks
There are no
linting errors
0.5 pts
Half Marks
There are no more
than 2 linting errors
0 pts
No Marks
There are 3 or
more linting errors
Does not exceed the time limit
Failure to do so applies a 20% deduction
to the total score (after any other
penalties)
0 pts
Fails expectation
Tests exceed the time limit. Apply a
20% deduction to the total score.
0 pts
Meets expectation
All tests run within the
specified time limit
Tests are not random enough
Tests must be random with no more than
4 digits hardcoded for the prefix. Failure
to do so is a 50% deduction (after
applying any other penalties)
0 pts
Fails expectation
Tests are not adequately random. Apply
a 50% deduction to the total score.
0 pts
Meets
expectations
All tests are random
enough
Total Points: 25
Criteria Ratings Pts

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