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CMPT 317
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Assignment 1
AIMA Chapter 3: Solving Problems by Searching

General Instructions
• This assignment is individual work. You may discuss questions and problems with anyone, but
the work you hand in for this assignment must be your own work.
• If you intend to use resources not supplied by the instructor, please check ?rst. In any case, you
must provide an attribution for any external resource (library, API, etc) you use. You should not use
any resource that substantially solves the problems in this assignment. If there’s any doubt, ask!
No harm can come from asking, even if my answer is no.
• Each question indicates what to hand in.
• Do not submit folders, or zip ?les, even if you think it will help.
• Assignments must be submitted to Moodle.
Version History
• 30/09/2018: Clari?cations to evaluation, and what to hand in for all questions.
• 14/09/2018: released to students
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Overview
In this assignment we’ll explore the ideas in AIMA Chapter 3 using a problem de?ned as follows.
Inverse Arithmetic Problem
. You are given a ?nite list of integers, L, and a target integer, T. The problem is to determine an integer
arithmetic expression E, using some or all of the integers in L, so that if E is evaluated according to the rules
of integer arithmetic, the answer is T.
Integer expressions will be constructed using only the operations +, −, ×, and integer division / (integer
division means we ignore the remainder, and use only the quotient, e.g. 5/2 = 2).
For example, the given information could be as follows:
• L = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7]
• T = 47
There are several possible expressions we can construct:
• ((2 × 4) × 5) + 7
• ((3 + 4) × 7) − 2
• (7 × 7) − 2
• (3 × 4) + (5 × 7)
For pragmatic reasons, we will look for linear expressions only, e.g., ((2×4)×5)+7, and we will not be trying
to ?nd non-linear expressions like (3 × 4) + (5 × 7). Restricting the shape makes your job easier, and including
non-linear expressions does not increase the insight you gain from this exercise. For this assignment, assume
that each value from L can be used at most once, but the operators can be used as many times as you need.
We’re interested in ?nding the expression that uses the fewest operations. Most problems will not have a
single unique shortest expressions, and almost all problems will have many much longer expressions.
Programming
You’ll have to do some programming here, and I’ll provide strong guidance about how to get things organized.
You can use any programming language you like, as long as it’s Python, Java, or C/C++. If you want to use a
di?erent language, please let me know before proceeding.
The arithmetic expressions are probably best represented by text strings. In Python, you have access to the
function eval(), which is quite powerful, but we can use it to calculate the value of any expression represented
as a string. If you’re using Java, you are permitted to use a third-party library to evaluate expression strings;
there are a few I found by Googling.
You’ll also be running your programs on a collection of examples. You’ll be expected to report on aspects
of this exercise.
Execution instructions
The markers may or may not wish to run your program, to verify your results. To help them, you should provide
brief instructions on what to do to get your program running. Include:
• Programming language used (including version, e.g., Java 8 or Python 3)
• A simple example of compiling and/or running the code from a UNIX shell would be best.
Keep it brief, and name it with the question number as the following example: a1q2_EXECUTION.txt. If your
assignment uses third party libraries, they have to be included in your submission.
Page 2
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Question 1 (10 points):
Purpose: To practice specifying problems, and to lay the groundwork for later questions.
Degree of Di?culty: Easy
AIMA Chapter(s): 3.1, 3.2
Specify the problem. De?ne:
1. The initial state.
2. The goal state.
3. The actions that can be applied to a given state.
4. The result of applying an action to a given state.
5. The path cost.
You should draw at least a portion of the problem space de?ned by the initial state and the actions in the
speci?cation, just to get a sense of what you’re dealing with. But you don’t need to hand your drawing in.
Implement your speci?cation using your programming language of choice. In particular, implement:
1. Problem State class
2. Problem class
Be sure to test your implementations thoroughly.
What to Hand In
• A ?le named a1q1.txt containing your de?nitions.
• A ?le named a1q1.LANG containing your implementation. Use the ?le extension appropriate for your
choice of programming language, e.g., .py or .java. If you have more than one ?le to submit, you
should use a1q1_ to pre?x your ?lenames.
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, and course number at the top of all documents.
Page 3
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Evaluation
• 5 marks: You de?ned the initial state, the goal state, the actions, and results, and the path cost. Your
?le a1q1.txt describes:
– The components of the data structure (or class) that stores the problem state.
– The method is_goal().
– The method actions(), and how you represented your actions.
– The method result().
– The path cost of sequences of actions (or sequences of states).
You may copy/paste block comments from your source code, if you’ve documented it well. Pointform is ?ne. Full marks will be given if the description is short, and if it is complete.
• 3 marks: Your implementation follows the suggested interface guidelines. Speci?cally:
– You have a function or method is_goal(state) that returns a Boolean.
– You have a function or method actions(state) that returns a list of actions.
– You have a function or method result(state, action) that returns a new state.
• 2 marks: Your implementation is well-documented. Speci?cally:
– Every function or method has at least a brief description of its purpose.
– Your name, NSID, and student number are in the ?le.
Page 4
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Question 2 (10 points):
Purpose: To build and apply uninformed search algorithms to the problem.
Degree of Di?culty: Moderate
AIMA Chapter(s): 3.3, 3.4
Using the guidelines provided in the textbook, and in lectures 03 and 04, implement TreeSearch, with the
following search strategies:
• Breadth-?rst
• Depth-?rst
• Depth-limited
• Iterative-deepening
Remember that the ?rst two strategies di?er only in the Frontier ADT implementation (queue, stack). Depthlimited search discards search nodes that exceed the depth-limit; iterative-deepening calls depth-limited
search with increasing depth limits until a solution is found.
Test your algorithms by applying them to the example problems found in the ?le simple_examples.txt.
Question 5 gets you to put your algorithms to a more intensive test. Each line in the example ?les gives a
target followed by the list of integers (separated by spaces).
Demonstrate by copy/paste from your output that your program generates solutions to a few interesting
problems, showing that the expression returned does evaluate to the target.
What to Hand In
• A ?le named a1q2_EXECUTION.txt containing brief instructions for compiling and/or running your
code. See page 1.
• A ?le named a1q2.txt containing a demonstration of the output of your program, which is copy/paste
from a console, or output ?le. You only need to show a few examples for each search strategy. If this
?le is missing, the marker will assume your implementation is incomplete or not working.
• A ?le named a1q2.LANG containing your implementation of the search algorithms. Use the ?le extension appropriate for your choice of programming language, e.g., .py or .java. You may submit
multiple ?les, provided that the ?lenames begin with a1q2_
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, and course number at the top of all documents.
Page 5
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Evaluation
• 2 marks: Your ?le a1q2.txt contains a few examples of output from your program.
• 4 marks: Your implementation follows the suggested interface guidelines. Speci?cally:
– You implemented tree search with a FIFO queue, i.e., breadth-?rst search.
– You implemented tree search with a LIFO queue, i.e., depth-?rst search.
– You implemented a version of depth-?rst search that limits the depth of search , i.e., depth-limited
search.
– You implemented iterative-deepening search using repeated calls to a depth-limited search.
The implementations may be separate functions, or they can be implemented by reusing a generalized treesearch algorithm.
• 2 marks: Your treesearch algorithm(s) use the methods is_goal(), actions(), and result() to interface with the Problem class.
• 2 marks: Your implementation is well-documented. Speci?cally:
– Every function or method has at least a brief description of its purpose.
– Your name, NSID, and student number are in the ?le.
Page 6
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Question 3 (10 points):
Purpose: To practice the design of heuristic evaluation functions for informed search.
Degree of Di?culty: Moderate
AIMA Chapter(s): 3.5, 3.6
Recall that a heuristic evaluation function is a measure attached to a given problem state; this measure
estimates the cost of the path from the problem state to the goal state. In the text, it’s represented by the
function h(n), where confusingly n is a search node containing a problem state. Recall also the lesson in
AIMA Chapter 3, which is that one way to derive a heuristic function is to relax one or more constraints in
the problem, and use the true future cost in the relaxed problem as an estimate for the future cost in the
problem you’re trying to solve.
Design a heuristic for the Inverse Arithmetic Problem. Give pseudo-code for calculating it, based on your
problem state, and the goal state. In your description, explain how your function comes from a relaxed
problem, and give two distinct examples of the heuristic evaluation function applied to a few simple problem states. Address the question of whether or not your heuristic function is admissible.
Notes:
• It’s more fun if your heuristic is good, but it doesn’t have to be good to get full marks. Make sure you
can make a case that it estimates cost to goal, even if not very well.
• You are not required to ?nd an admissible heuristic, but you need to know whether it is or not!
What to Hand In
• A ?le named a1q3.txt containing a brief description of your heuristic evaluation function, mentioning
the points described above.
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, and course number at the top of all documents.
Evaluation
• 2 marks: Your description is clear and generally well-written.
• 3 marks: Your pseudocode description gives a clear picture of the heuristic function.
• 2 marks: You gave at least two examples of the heuristic function to real problem states.
• 3 marks: You addressed the question of admissibility clearly demonstrating that you understand the
concept. It does not matter if your heuristic function is or is not admissible; just be sure you know
which!
Page 7
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Question 4 (10 points):
Purpose: To build and apply informed search algorithms to the problem.
Degree of Di?culty: Easy
AIMA Chapter(s): 3.5
Using the guidelines provided in the textbook, and in lecture, implement TreeSearch, with the following
search strategies:
• Uniform-cost search (UCS)
• Greedy best-?rst search (GBFS)
• A
∗ Search
Remember that these three strategies di?er only the measure that the frontier ADT uses to organize the
search nodes. UCS uses g(n) only; GBFS uses h(n) only; A∗ uses g(n) + h(n); here, g(n) is the path cost
from the initial state to the state contained in node n, and h(n) is your heuristic evaluation function from
the previous question.
Test your algorithms by applying them to the example problems found in the ?le simple_examples.txt.
Each line in the example ?les gives a target followed by the list of integers (separated by spaces).
Demonstrate by copy/paste from your output that your program generates solutions to a few interesting
problems, showing that the expression returned does evaluate to the target.
What to Hand In
• A ?le named a1q4_EXECUTION.txt containing brief instructions for compiling and/or running your
code. See page 1.
• A ?le named a1q4.txt containing a demonstration of the output of your program, which is copy/paste
from a console, or output ?le. You only need to show a few examples for each search strategy. If this
?le is missing, the marker will assume your implementation is incomplete or not working.
• A ?le named a1q4.LANG containing your implementation of the search algorithms. Use the ?le extension appropriate for your choice of programming language, e.g., .py or .java. You may submit
multiple ?les, provided that they ?lenames begin with a1q4_
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, and course number at the top of all documents.
Page 8
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Evaluation
• 2 marks: Your ?le a1q4.txt contains a few examples of output from your program.
• 4 marks: Your implementation follows the suggested interface guidelines. Speci?cally:
– You implemented tree search with a priority queue.
– You implemented UCS using treesearch with a priority queue, taking path-cost g(n) to order the
priority queue.
– You implemented UCS using treesearch with a priority queue, taking estimated cost to goal h(n)
to order the priority queue.
– You implemented UCS using treesearch with a priority queue, taking estimated solution cost
f(n) = g(n) + h(n) to order the priority queue.
The implementations may be separate functions, or they can be implemented by reusing a generalized treesearch algorithm.
• 2 marks: Your treesearch algorithm(s) use the methods is_goal(), actions(), and result() to interface with the Problem class.
• 2 marks: Your implementation is well-documented. Speci?cally:
– Every function or method has at least a brief description of its purpose.
– Your name, NSID, and student number are in the ?le.
Page 9
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Question 5 (10 points):
Purpose: To apply your algorithms to more di?cult problems, and draw conclusions from the results.
Degree of Di?culty: Moderate
AIMA Chapter(s): 3 (all)
In the ?les moderate_examples.txt and harder_examples.txt you’ll ?nd problems that should challenge
some of your implementations, and will give you an idea about how well your heuristic evaluation function
(Question 3) works.
Run your algorithms (uninformed and informed) on these problems to gauge the quality of your implementations. Give a report on what you found. You might discuss all or any of the following criteria for empirical
evaluation:
• Which algorithms used the most time to solve the problems?
• Which algorithms used the most memory to solve the problems?
• How often did your algorithms ?nd an optimal solution?
• Did any algorithms run so long that you terminated them before they returned an answer? If so, which
algorithms did you terminate most frequently?
To answer this question, you could consider any of the following modi?cations to your search algorithms:
• Add code to time the search. Use a clock twice: just before starting the search loop, and just before
you return a solution.
• Add a time threshold to your search algorithms, to terminate long-running searches. Set the threshold
to short values until you are sure everything is working, and then set it longer to collect your data.
• Count the number of nodes that your search generates, and the maximum size of your frontier over
the course of solving a single problem. Both of these statistics can be insightful!
• Don’t calculate average times (or memory) across the set of problems. An average isn’t really meaningful here, because the variation in problem di?culty is too high. Instead, count the number of times
one algorithm is faster than another, and by how much.
• How well does your heuristic function from Question 3 work, compared to uninformed algorithms?
Comment on your ?ndings. Include tables, plots, etc to support your ?ndings.
What to Hand In
• A ?le named a1q5.txt (other formats, DOC, DOCX, PDF, are acceptable) containing a discussion of
your ?ndings in this question.
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, and course number at the top of all documents.
Page 10
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Evaluation
• 5 marks: Your description is clear and generally well-written.
• 5 marks: Your description is based on data (tables, plots), and not simply vague impressions you
obtained while coding.
– You summarized the behaviour of the di?erent uninformed and informed search strategies on the
collections of example problems provided.
– Your summary mentioned issues related to completeness, optimality, as well as performance in
terms of time (clock, or nodes expanded), and memory (maximum size of the frontier).
– Your description included a discussion of the quality of your heuristic function from Question 3,
by comparing your informed results to the uninformed results.
Page 11
Department of Computer Science
176 Thorvaldson Building
110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9, Canada
Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 317
Fall 2018
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Extra work for the ambitious
1. Implement the GraphSearch algorithm, and compare your results to the TreeSearch algorithm results.
2. Drop the assumption that a number can be used at most once. Ask Mike for example problems that are
created by allowing multiple uses of some numbers. Compare your results to the other variation.
Page 12

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