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Lab 2: A Math Game

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Lab 2: A Math Game
Lab Objective
The objective of this lab is to build complex combinational and sequential logic
circuits.
In this lab you will implement a math game. Two random 4-bit 2SC numbers will be
generated, and the user must guess what the addition or subtraction of those two
numbers are.
Your design must:
1. Determine if the user entered the correct value
2. Keep track of the score
3. Modify the score according to the rules.
Game Play
1. To begin the game, reset the score to 0 by pressing the “Reset Score” button.
2. Next, generate two new numbers by pressing the “New Problem” button. The two
random numbers will be displayed on two 7-segment LEDs, “Random #0” and
“Random #1”.
3. The user should choose whether to add or subtract the random numbers using the
“Function” switch. When the switch is low, the random numbers should be added
together (r0+r1), and when it’s high, the numbers should be subtracted
(r0-r1).
4. Lastly, the user should make a guess that corresponds to the result of the
computation from step 3 using the keypad and press “Update Score”. If there is
an overflow of the addition or subtraction, the LED labeled “Overflow” should
turn on.
Scorekeeping
The score will be adjusted as such:
+1 point: user successfully guesses result
-1 point: user guesses incorrect result
The score will be stored in a 4 bit register. This running score will be kept track
of by your circuit and will allow for both negative and positive score values in the
range -8 to 7 (4-bit two’s complement).
Lab 2 Page 1 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Specification
Template
Build your lab starting with the template file provided on Canvas. The template file
contains the user interface (page 1) and logic to generate the random numbers (page
2). DO NOT MODIFY THE FIRST PAGE except for your name, CruzID, and placeholder
comments indicating if you implemented the extra credit. Do not modify the random
number circuits on the second page.
Replace “Y/N” with Y if you implemented the extra credit option, and N if you didn’t.
There are placeholder signal senders and receivers on the second page that you should
use. You may remove these senders and receivers from the second page as you use them
in your design. Additional wires and logic circuits shall be drawn on subsequent
pages. Remember to rename the template file to Lab2.lgi before
committing to your repository.
Figure: Lab 2 Template
Lab 2 Page 2 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
User Interface
Inputs
Reset Score Resets the register and score to 0, normally off
Function Used to select between addition (switch = 0) and subtraction
(switch = 1)
New Problem Gives a new set of random numbers, normally off
Update Score Updates the register and score, normally off
Gamepad Used to make a guess of the resulting computation
Cheat Allows user to hide the correct answer to make it a game (extra
credit)
0 = don’t cheat => make “correct answer” display “0”
1 = cheat => display correct answer
Outputs
Register Value Raw value from the register storing the score, displayed as
4-bit two’s complement
Signed Decimal
Score
Human readable score, i.e. two’s complement score converted to a
sign and magnitude. E.g. if register value is F (1111 as binary
or -1), the sgn display would have the middle segment
illuminated to show “-” and the magnitude would display “1”.
(Hint: If the number is negative, display the additive inverse
and a negative sign.)
Random #0 4-bit two’s complement number
Range of possible values: -8 to 7.
If function = 0, Random #0 will be added to Random #1
If function = 1, Random #1 will be subtracted from Random #0
Note: If F is displayed this is equivalent to -1
Random #1 4-bit two’s complement number
Range of possible values: -8 to 7.
If function = 0, Random #1 will be added to Random #0
If function = 1, Random #1 will be subtracted from Random #0
Correct Answer The 4-bit two’s complement result of the addition or subtraction
of Random #0 and Random #1
Overflow LED Light signifying there was an overflow in the computation
Lab 2 Page 3 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Design Layout
The blank pages of the template are labeled with suggestions for the components that
should be drawn on that page, e.g. “Score Register,” and “Display Logic.” You may use
as many pages as needed to keep your circuits looking legible. For ease of grading,
please follow this order of components:
1 – Function logic Used to implement the correct operation (add or subtract)
2 – Random Number Adder Used to add (or subtract) two numbers together
3 – Overflow Logic Determines if computation overflowed
4 – 4-bit Comparator Compares user guess to correct answer
5 – Multiplexors Used to select between +1 and -1 as a score modifier
6 – Score Adder Modifies score
7 – Score Register Stores game score
8 – Display Logic Converts game score to human readable sign and magnitude
decimal score
Lab 2 Page 4 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Top Level
Here is a top-level block diagram of the game.
Figure: Top Level Diagram
Lab 2 Page 5 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Overflow
Overflow (or underflow) occurs when the outcome of an arithmetic operation is
incorrect due to the limitation of how the value is stored. In this game, if overflow
or underflow occurs in the computation of the two random numbers, The Overflow LED
should light up.
For example, the 4-bit 2SC computation +7 + +1 = +8 (01000), would cause overflow.
The register can only store the least significant 4 bits (1000). In 4-bit 2SC, 1000
is -8.
This can also happen for negative values: -8 + -1 = -9 (10111), but with only 4-bits
to represent this value, it appears as +7 (0111).
README.txt
This file must be a plain text (.txt) file. For full credit, it should contain your
first and last name (as it appears on Canvas) and your CruzID. Your answers to the
questions should total at least 150 words. Your README should adhere to the following
template:
————————
Lab 2: A Math Game
CMPE 012 Spring 2019
Last Name, First Name
CruzID
————————-
What did you learn in this lab?
Write the answer here.
What worked well? Did you encounter any issues?
Write the answer here.
How would you redesign this lab to make it better?
Write the answer here.
What external resources did you use to complete this lab?
(Not including course materials)
Write the answer here.
Did you work with anyone on the labs? Describe the level of collaboration.
Write the answer here.
Extra Credit
There are three extra credit options for this lab:
1. Implement a cheat switch
2. Add functionality that prevents the score from overflowing (going over +7)
3. Add functionality that prevents the score from underflowing (going beyond -8)
Lab 2 Page 6 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Extra Credit Option 1: Cheat Switch
Connect the cheat switch to control the output of the Correct Answer display. If the
cheat switch is on, the correct answer should be displayed. If the cheat switch is
off, the Correct Answer display should show a “0”
Extra Credit Options 2 and 3: Max and Min Score
With the current implementation, the score will not stop at the upper score boundary
of +7, or the lower score boundary of -8. For instance, if the score is currently +7,
and the score is incremented by 1, the result overflows to 0b1000 which is -8 in
4-bit 2SC.
For extra credit option 2, add functionality to your circuit that keeps the score
from overflowing.
For extra credit option 3, add functionality to your circuit that keeps the score
from underflowing.
Important Stuff
For the register, use D flip-flops, and make sure they are edge triggered with a
clear line. You may NOT use the counter, mux or ALU objects provided in MML.
USE DON’T USE
Figure 2: MML Palette
For your convenience, here is a tabular description of how flip-flop with clear line
works. You may also find practice_flipflop.lgi handy for understanding how flip-flops
set and reset.
Examples of how to hook up the D flip-flop is included in practice_flipflop.lgi.
Lab 2 Page 7 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Figure 4: Flip-flop Usage Example
Comments
Each page should be labeled with your last name, first name, and CruzID (the name
used in your UCSC email address). Label each circuit with a description of the
functionality and the part of the lab that they are for.
Visual Structure
Presentation of information is an important part of deliverables. Clean documentation
is easy to comprehend and looks professional. Your circuits should be structured in
an organized method that is easy to read and interpret. Using the “Snap to Grid”
setting under the View menu makes it easy to line up components. A clean circuit uses
many senders and receivers with meaningful names, and has no wires crossing over each
other. Note that there may be multiple receivers for one sender. See below for
examples of messy and clean circuits.
Messy Circuit Example
Lab 2 Page 8 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz
Clean Circuit Example
Missing Wire Best Practices
MML has a known bug which causes some wires to disappear after reopening the file. To
reduce the likelihood of this occurring, DO NOT use the “Node” tool (it’s a tiny
black dot located at the top-right of the tool palette). This tool is particularly
vulnerable to the bug.
If this bug occurs, the grader will attempt to repair the missing wire in your file.
This is only possible if your circuit is very readable. Make sure that wires do not
cross whenever possible. Wire paths should be short and direct. Use receivers very
liberally.
Grading Rubric
TBD
Lab 2 Page 9 of 9 Spring 2019
© 2019, Computer Engineering Department, University of California – Santa Cruz

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