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Workshop #10: Function Templates

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Workshop #10: Function Templates
Version 2.0 (Submissions are open)

In this workshop, you are to code four function templates:
– “check”: to check a value in a compound type array against a given key is a specific index
– “search”: to search through a compound type array (using the check function before) and insert the matches found into a Collection of the same compound type.
– “listArrayElements”: to list elements of an array with a title
– “sizeCheck”: to compare the sizes of two collections of the same compound type.

## Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this workshop, you will have demonstrated the abilities to:

–    code function templates
–    implement calls to function templates
–    describe what you have learned in completing this workshop

## Submission Policy

The workshop is divided into one coding part and one non-coding part:

– Part 1: worth 100% of the workshop’s total mark, is due on **Friday at 23:59:59** of the week of your scheduled lab.
– Part 2 (reflection): non-coding part, is due on **Monday at 23:59:59** of the week of your scheduled lab. The reflection doesn’t have marks associated with it but can incur a **penalty of max 40% of the whole workshop’s mark** if your professor deems it insufficient (you make your marks from the code, but you can lose some on the reflection).

## Compiling and Testing Your Program

All your code should be compiled using this command on `matrix`:

“`bash
g++ -Wall -std=c++11 -g -o ws file1.cpp file2.cpp …
“`

– `-Wall`: compiler will report all warnings
– `-std=c++11`: the code will be compiled using the C++11 standard
– `-g`: the executable file will contain debugging symbols, allowing *valgrind* to create better reports
– `-o ws`: the compiled application will be named `ws`

After compiling and testing your code, run your program as following to check for possible memory leaks (assuming your executable name is `ws`):

“`bash
valgrind ws
“`

To check the output, use a program that can compare text files.  Search online for such a program for your platform, or use *diff* available on `matrix`.

> Note: All the code written in workshops and the project must be implemented in the **sdds** namespace.

# PART 1 (100%)

Look at the code provided in the **Collection** template module, study it and understand it. The Collection class is a template that works like a dynamic array of objects and resizes itself as objects are added to it. The code snippet below demonstrates how Collection works:

“`C++
Collection<double> Cdbl;
Cdbl.add(1.23);
Cdbl.add(2.34);
Cdbl.add(3.45);
cout << “There are ” << Cdbl.size() << ” items in the Collection!” << endl;
for(int i=0; i< Cdbl.size();i++){
cout << Cdbl[i] << endl;
}
“`
Output:
“`Text
There are 3 items in the Collection!
1.23
2.34
3.45
“`
## Supplied Modules:
– Collection
– ReadWrite
– Employee
– Student
– Car

**Do not modify these modules!**  Look at the code and make sure you understand them.

# Modules that you will modify (The searchNlist module and the main module)

## searchNlist module
Implement this module in ‘searchNlist.h’ header file.

– “check”: to check a value in a compound type array against a given key is a specific index
– “search”: to search through a compound type array (using the check function before) and insert the matches found into a Collection of the same compound type.
– “listArrayElements”: to list elements of an array with a title
– “sizeCheck”: to compare the sizes of two collections of the same compound type.

### `check` function template

Create a function template called **check** to check a value in a compound type array against a given key in a specific index
– An array of templated objects; the same type as the Collection type. (template type 1)
– An integer variable that represents the index to use in the comparison
– A  **key** templated value to search for, in the array of objects. (template type 2)

The check function is rather simple and will return true or false based on the following condition:
– if the element at index **i** of the array equals the key or not
Use the “==” operator to check for a match between the objects and the key. This operator is overloaded in each testing class used.

### `search` function template

Create a function template called **search** that accepts four arguments in any order you prefer:
– An array of templated objects; the same type as the Collection type. (template type 1)
– An integer represents the number of elements in the array of objects
– A  **key** templated value to search for, in the array of objects. (template type 2)
– A reference to a Collection of templated objects (template type 1). The Collection is defined in **Collection.h**

The search function template returns a bool that is true only if at least one match to the key is found in the array of objects and false otherwise.
The search function goes through all the elements of the array of objects and adds all the matches found to the Collection.
**You are required to use the check function created above for a match between the object at a specific location and the key**

### `listArrayElements` function template
Lists all the elements of an array.

Create a function template called **listArrayElements** that accepts three arguments in any order you prefer:
– A `const char*` for a Title to be printed as the Title of the list.
– A constant array of templated objects (template type)
– The number of the elements of the array.

This function first prints the **Title** and then goes to newline.

Then it will print the row number and then insert each element of the array into cout with a newline attached.

For example, if this function is called for the following array of integers.
“`C++
int a[]{10,20,30,40};
“`
using the Title value of “INTEGERS” and the number of elements as 4, the output would be like the following.
“`text
INTEGERS
1: 10
2: 20
3: 30
4: 40
“`

### `sizeCheck` function template

Create a function template called **sizeCheck** that accepts two arguments in any order you prefer:
– A reference to a Collection of templated objects representing collection 1. The Collection is defined in **Collection.h**
– A reference to a Collection of templated objects representing collection 2. The Collection is defined in **Collection.h**

This function simply compares the sizes of the two collections and return true if the size of the first collection is larger and false otherwise.

### Template type requirements
Have a comment section for each function and explain what requirements each type of your templates must have to be able to work with your logic.
**Then also copy these comments to the part 2 reflection of the workshop.**

## The main module
> In this workshop you are modifying the main module. Make sure to update the comments at the top to reflect your work on the module

Modify the main module and call the **search** function at the condition of the five **if** statements in the source code.
> See the comments in **main.cpp** on where to use this function

Modify the main module and call the **sizeCheck** function at the condition of the specified **if** statement in the source code.
> See the comments in **main.cpp** on where to use this function

Also, call the **listArrayElement** function four times before the first three **if** statements and at the end of the main() function to list the elements of the integer array **a**.
> See the comments in **main.cpp** on where to use this function

“`C++
// Workshop 10:
// Version: 2.0
// Date: 2021-11-18
// Author: Fardad Soleimanloo
// // Description:
// This file tests the lab section of your workshop
// Modify the main function as stated in the workshop description
/////////////////////////////////////////////
#include <iostream>
#include “Car.h”
#include “Employee.h”
#include “ReadWrite.h”
#include “Student.h”
#include “Collection.h”
#include “searchNlist.h”
using namespace std;
using namespace sdds;

int main() {
Car C[7] = { Car(“GVFGHI”, “Tesla Model S”), Car(“ABCDEF”, “BMW 320”), Car(“CDEFGH”, “Ford Festiva”),
Car(“BCDEFG”, “Ford Festiva”),Car(“GVDGHI”, “Tesla Model 3”), Car(“EFGHIJ”, “Nissan Maxima”),
Car(“GVDEFG”, “Tesla Model X”) };
Student S[6] = { Student(23456, “Lisa Simpson”,4.0),Student(45678, “Ralph Wiggum”,2.1), Student(56789, “Milhouse Van Houten”,4.0),
Student(67890, “Todd Flanders”, 3.5), Student(34567, “Nelson Muntz”,3.0),Student(12345, “Bart Simpson”,1.5) };
Employee E[6] = { Employee(213456, “Carl Carlson”, 62344.56,111), Employee(122345, “Mindy Simmons”, 65432.44,222),
Employee(435678, “Lenny Leonard”, 43213.22,111), Employee(546789, “Waylon Smithers”, 654321.55,333),
Employee(657890, “Frank Grimes”, 34567.88,333), Employee(364567, “Homer Simpson”, 55432.11,111) };

//these collections will hold the results of the searches
Collection<Car> Cres1;
Collection<Car> Cres2;
Collection<Student> Sres;
Collection<Employee>Eres;

// Call the  listArrayElements to list all cars in the array C, Title: “All the cars:”, size is 7
listArrayElements(………………….);
cout << “Searching for Tesla cars: ” << endl;

// Call the search function to search the array C
// and store the matches in Cres1 passing “a” as the key argument
if (search(………………….)) {
cout << Cres1.size() << ” match” << (Cres1.size() == 1 ? “” : “es”) << ” found:” << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < Cres1.size(); i++) {
cout << (i + 1) << “: ” << Cres1[i] << endl;
}
}
else {
cout << “No matches found!” << endl;
}
cout << endl;

// Call the search function to search the array C
// and store the matches in Cres2 passing “b” as the key argument
if (search(………………….))
{
cout << Cres2.size() << ” match” << (Cres2.size() == 1 ? “” : “es”) << ” found:” << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < Cres1.size(); i++)
{
cout << (i + 1) << “: ” << Cres1[i] << endl;
}
}
else
{
cout << “No matches found!” << endl;
}
cout << endl;

//call the function sizeCheck and pass the resulted collections from the previous two searches
// print “Collection 1 got more results!!”, “Collection 2 got more results!!” or “equal results”
if (sizeCheck(………………….))
cout << “Collection 1 got more results!!” << endl;
else
cout << “Collection 1 got less than or equal collection 2 results!!” << endl;

cout << endl;

// Call the  listArrayElements to list all the students, Title: “All students:”
listArrayElements(………………….);

cout << “Searching for students with 4.0 Gpa:” << endl;
// Call the search function to search the array S
// and store the matches in Sres passing 4.0 as the key argument
if (search(………………….)) {
cout << Sres.size() << ” match” << (Sres.size() == 1 ? “” : “es”) << ” found:” << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < Sres.size(); i++) {
cout << (i + 1) << “: ” << Sres[i] << endl;
}
}
else {
cout << “No matches found!” << endl;
}
cout << endl;

// Call the  listArrayElements to list all the employees, Title: “All employees:”
listArrayElements(………………….);

cout << “Searching for employees who share office number 111:” << endl;
// Call the search function to search the array E
// and store the matches in Eres passing 111 as the key argument
if (search(………………….)) {
cout << Eres.size() << ” match” << (Eres.size() == 1 ? “” : “es”) << ” found:” << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < Eres.size(); i++) {
cout << (i + 1) << “: ” << Eres[i] << endl;
}
}
else {
cout << “No matches found!” << endl;
}
cout << endl;

cout << “Searching for employees who share office number 555:” << endl;
// Call the search function to search the array E
// and store the matches in Eres passing 555 as the key argument
if (search(………………….)) {
cout << Eres.size() << ” match” << (Eres.size() == 1 ? “” : “es”) << ” found:” << endl;
for (int i = 0; i < Eres.size(); i++) {
cout << (i + 1) << “: ” << Eres[i] << endl;
}
}
else {
cout << “No matches found!” << endl;
}
cout << endl;

int a[]{ 10,20,30,40,50,60 };

// Call the  listArrayElements to list all the integers in the array a
// Title: “INTEGERS”
listArrayElements(………………….);
return 0;
}
“`
## output

“`Text
All the cars:
1: GVFGHI Tesla Model S
2: ABCDEF BMW 320
3: CDEFGH Ford Festiva
4: BCDEFG Ford Festiva
5: GVDGHI Tesla Model 3
6: EFGHIJ Nissan Maxima
7: GVDEFG Tesla Model X
Searching for Tesla cars:
6 matches found:
1: GVFGHI Tesla Model S
2: CDEFGH Ford Festiva
3: BCDEFG Ford Festiva
4: GVDGHI Tesla Model 3
5: EFGHIJ Nissan Maxima
6: GVDEFG Tesla Model X

No matches found!

Collection 1 got more results!!

All students:
1: 23456 Lisa Simpson GPA: 4.0
2: 45678 Ralph Wiggum GPA: 2.1
3: 56789 Milhouse Van Houten GPA: 4.0
4: 67890 Todd Flanders GPA: 3.5
5: 34567 Nelson Muntz GPA: 3.0
6: 12345 Bart Simpson GPA: 1.5
Searching for students with 4.0 Gpa:
2 matches found:
1: 23456 Lisa Simpson GPA: 4.0
2: 56789 Milhouse Van Houten GPA: 4.0

All employees:
1: 213456 Carl Carlson (Office# 111) Salary: $62344.56
2: 122345 Mindy Simmons (Office# 222) Salary: $65432.44
3: 435678 Lenny Leonard (Office# 111) Salary: $43213.22
4: 546789 Waylon Smithers (Office# 333) Salary: $654321.55
5: 657890 Frank Grimes (Office# 333) Salary: $34567.88
6: 364567 Homer Simpson (Office# 111) Salary: $55432.11
Searching for employees who share office number 111:
3 matches found:
1: 213456 Carl Carlson (Office# 111) Salary: $62344.56
2: 435678 Lenny Leonard (Office# 111) Salary: $43213.22
3: 364567 Homer Simpson (Office# 111) Salary: $55432.11

Searching for employees who share office number 555:
No matches found!

INTEGERS
1: 10
2: 20
3: 30
4: 40
5: 50
6: 60
“`

## Files to submit
“`Text
Collection.h
Car.h
Car.cpp
Employee.h
Employee.cpp
Student.h
Student.cpp
ReadWrite.h
ReadWrite.cpp
main.cpp
serchNlist.h
“`

## PART 1 Submission

Upload your source code and data file to your `matrix` account. Compile and run your code using the `g++` compiler as shown above and make sure that everything works properly.

Then, run the following command from your account
– replace `profname.proflastname` with your professor’s Seneca userid
– replace **??** with your subject code (2**00** or 2**44**)
– replace **#** with the workshop number
– replace **X** with the workshop part number (**1** or **2**)
“`text
~profname.proflastname/submit 2??/w#/pX
“`

and follow the instructions.

> **⚠️Important:** Please note that a successful submission does not guarantee full credit for this workshop. If the professor is not satisfied with your implementation, your professor may ask you to resubmit. Re-submissions will attract a penalty.

# Part 2: Reflection

Study your final solutions for each deliverable of the workshop **and the most recent milestones of the project**, reread the related parts of the course notes, and make sure that you have understood the concepts covered by this workshop.  **This should take no less than 30 minutes of your time and the result is suggested to be at least 150 words in length.**

Create a file named `reflect.txt` that contains your detailed description of the topics that you have learned in completing this workshop and **the project milestones** and mention any issues that caused you difficulty.

## Reflection Submission (part 2)

Upload the **reflect.txt** to your `matrix` account.

Then, run the following command from your account
– replace `profname.proflastname` with your professor’s Seneca userid
– replace **??** with your subject code (2**00** or 2**44**)
– replace **#** with the workshop number
– replace **X** with the workshop part number (**1** or **2**)
“`text
~profname.proflastname/submit 2??/w#/pX
“`

and follow the instructions.

> **⚠️Important:** Please note that a successful submission does not guarantee full credit for this workshop. If the professor is not satisfied with your implementation, your professor may ask you to resubmit. Re-submissions will attract a penalty.

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