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Workshop #2 C language program that accepts numerical values

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Workshop #2
Worth: 0.75% of final grade
Introduction
In this workshop, you will code and execute a C language program that accepts numerical values from the user, stores
the values in variables of the appropriate data type, performs monetary calculations on the stored variables (including
the modulus operator) and casts one data type to another.
Topic(s)
• Types, Calculations, Expressions
Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this workshop, you will have demonstrated the abilities to:
• Code a simple calculation using C operators and expressions
• Accept a numerical value from the user using scanf
• Cast a value from one data type to another
• Use integral data types to manage 2-digit precision points for a monetary application and manually manage
rounding to avoid misrepresented values that can be stored when using floating-point types
• Describe to your instructor what you have learned in completing this workshop
Part-1 (10%)
Instructions
Download or clone workshop 2 (WS02) from https://github.com/Seneca-144100/IPC-Workshops
Note: If you use the download option, make sure you EXTRACT the files from the .zip archive file
1. Carefully review the “Part-1 Output Example” (next section) to see how this program is expected to work
2. Code your solution to Part-1 in the provided “w2p1.c” source code file.
3. Create the necessary variables that will be used to store the prices of three (3) shirt sizes. Use meaningful selfdescribed names and of the appropriate data type
4. Display the shirt price list using the standard two-decimal precision representation for the prices
5. Monetary systems represent currency in dollars and cents and commonly to two (2) decimal precision points
(representing the cents portion of the value: $17.96). This would lead you wanting to use floating-point data types
throughout your solution, but this CAN lead to unexpected results depending on the operations you need to
perform (presents itself as an unexplained case of “lost” pennies/cents).
To address this problem (and for this workshop) you must restrict your operations to using only INTEGRAL data
types and work in the lowest coin denomination “pennies” (cents). Therefore, all remaining variables you declare
must be INTEGRAL types only.
Hints
• You will need to manually apply rounding as required to bump up a cent in cases when half a cent or more is
encountered (ex: if a calculated value results in 77.34578, then the 4.578 cents should be stored as 7735 total
cents).
• To display currency stored as total cents (ex: 7735) in the friendly dollars and cents format (ex: 77.35) you will
need to divide the total cents variable by 100 and apply casting to promote the value to a float-point type
6. You will need to calculate and store the sub-total (before taxes are applied) to a variable based on the number of
shirts being purchased at the appropriate shirt price
7. You will need to calculate and store the taxes to a variable based on the sub-total
8. You will need to calculate the total by adding the calculated sub-total and taxes values
9. Display the shopping cart details including a breakdown of charges into the sub-total, taxes, and total components.
Note
Display the currency components to four (4) decimal precision points. Use the following printf format specifier
(replace the … parts as required to complete the statement accordingly):
printf(“… $%8.4lf”…
Part-1 Output Example (Note: Use the YELLOW highlighted user-input data for submission)
Set Shirt Prices
================
Enter the price for a SMALL shirt: $17.96
Enter the price for a MEDIUM shirt: $26.96
Enter the price for a LARGE shirt: $35.97
Shirt Store Price List
======================
SMALL : $17.96
MEDIUM : $26.96
LARGE : $35.97
Patty’s shirt size is ‘S’
Number of shirts Patty is buying: 8
Patty’s shopping cart…
Contains : 8 shirts
Sub-total: $143.6800
Taxes : $ 18.6800
Total : $162.3600
Part-1 Submission
1. Upload (file transfer) your source file “w2p1.c” to your matrix account
2. Login to matrix in an SSH terminal and change directory to where you placed your workshop source code.
3. Manually compile and run your program to make sure everything works properly:
gcc -Wall w2p1.c -o w2 <ENTER>
If there are no errors/warnings generated, execute it: w2 <ENTER>
4. Run the submission command below (replace profname.proflastname with your professors Seneca userid and
replace NAA with your section):
~profName.proflastname/submit 144w2/NAA_p1 <ENTER>
5. Follow the on-screen submission instructions
Part-2 (40%)
Instructions
1. Copy the main function code from your Part-1 solution and paste it into the provided “w2p2.c” source code file. Be
careful not to overwrite the starter code provided in the “w2p2.c” file.
2. Carefully review the “Part-2 Output Example” (next section) to see how the program is expected to work
3. You will need to modify the code as required to produce a solution to work as demonstrated in the sample output.
4. Displaying the sales data in a tabular format requires the application of some slightly more advanced formatting
features (you will learn more about this later in the semester). For now, you can use the first data line below to get
you going (copy/paste into your code), and complete the printf statement accordingly:
printf(“Patty %-4c %5.2lf %3d %9.4lf %9.4lf %9.4lf\n”,…
Similarly, the totals row for the above table also requires some more advanced formatting. Use the following printf
statement and complete it accordingly:
printf(“%33.4lf %9.4lf %9.4lf\n\n”,…
5. In a tabular format, show how the daily total retail sales would be broken down by coin denominations if it were to
be converted to only coins (start from the largest denomination working down to the smallest). To accomplish this,
you will need to apply integer division (/) to obtain the number of coins for a given denomination, followed by an
application of the modulus operator (%) to obtain the new remaining amount (to be used in the next coin
calculation).
Note
• The first table is based on the sub-total and excludes taxes
• The second table is based on the total and includes taxes
6. The first data row shows only the starting balance, followed by the coin denominations in the subsequent rows.
Use the partially formed printf statements below which give you a hint at how the first two (2) rows can be
formatted (you will need to complete the statements accordingly):
printf(“%22.4lf\n”,…
printf(“Toonies %3d %9.4lf\n”, …
7. After each table, display the calculated average cost per shirt accordingly
Part-2 Output Example (Note: Use the YELLOW highlighted user-input data for submission)
Set Shirt Prices
================
Enter the price for a SMALL shirt: $17.96
Enter the price for a MEDIUM shirt: $26.96
Enter the price for a LARGE shirt: $35.97
Shirt Store Price List
======================
SMALL : $17.96
MEDIUM : $26.96
LARGE : $35.97
Patty’s shirt size is ‘S’
Number of shirts Patty is buying: 6
Tommy’s shirt size is ‘L’
Number of shirts Tommy is buying: 3
Sally’s shirt size is ‘M’
Number of shirts Sally is buying: 4
Customer Size Price Qty Sub-Total Tax Total
——– —- —– — ——— ——— ———
Patty S 17.96 6 107.7600 14.0100 121.7700
Sally M 26.96 4 107.8400 14.0200 121.8600
Tommy L 35.97 3 107.9100 14.0300 121.9400
——– —- —– — ——— ——— ———
323.5100 42.0600 365.5700
Daily retail sales represented by coins
=======================================
Sales EXCLUDING tax
Coin Qty Balance
——– — ———
323.5100
Toonies 161 1.5100
Loonies 1 0.5100
Quarters 2 0.0100
Dimes 0 0.0100
Nickels 0 0.0100
Pennies 1 0.0000
Average cost/shirt: $24.8854
Sales INCLUDING tax
Coin Qty Balance
——– — ———
365.5700
Toonies 182 1.5700
Loonies 1 0.5700
Quarters 2 0.0700
Dimes 0 0.0700
Nickels 1 0.0200
Pennies 2 0.0000
Average cost/shirt: $28.1208
Reflection (50%)
Instructions
Record your answer(s) to the reflection question(s) in the provided “reflect.txt” text file
1. Given the following C statements:
float price1 = 17.96f, price3 = 17.98f;
double price2 = 17.96, price4 = 17.98;
printf(“1. 17.96 = %f (as cents:%d)\n”, price1, (int)(price1 * 100));
printf(“2. 17.96 = %lf (as cents:%d)\n”, price2, (int)(price2 * 100));
printf(“3. 17.98 = %f (as cents:%d)\n”, price3, (int)(price3 * 100));
printf(“4. 17.98 = %lf (as cents:%d)\n”, price4, (int)(price4 * 100));
Execute the above sample code on your machine. Briefly explain why price1 and the corresponding converted
cent value does not properly represent the intended value. Why do you think all the other samples work as
expected?
2. Execute the below code on your machine:
int money = 7245;
printf(“1. $%.2lf\n”, money / 100.0);
printf(“2. $%.2lf\n”, money / (double)100);
printf(“3. $%.2lf\n”, (double)money / 100);
Explain why these three examples work as intended. Apply terms like cast, promotion, coercion, implicit, and
explicit in your answer.
3. Execute the following code on your machine:
int result, money = 7245;
result = money / 100;
printf(“1. $%.2lf\n”, money / 100);
printf(“2. $%d\n”, money / 100);
printf(“3. $%.2lf\n”, result);
printf(“4. $%d\n”, result);
Apply terms like cast, promotion, truncation, coercion, implicit, and explicit in answering the following
questions.
a) What is the value of the variable result? Explain why.
b) What values are displayed for samples 1, 2, 3, and 4?
c) What can you conclude about the printf function that causes samples 1 and 3 not to work as expected?
Part-2 Submission
1. Upload your source file “w2p2.c” to your matrix account
2. Upload your reflection file “reflect.txt” to your matrix account (to the same directory)
3. Login to matrix in an SSH terminal and change directory to where you placed your workshop source code.
4. Manually compile and run your program to make sure everything works properly:
gcc -Wall w2p2.c -o w2 <ENTER>
If there are no errors/warnings generated, execute it: w2 <ENTER>
5. Run the submission command below (replace profname.proflastname with your professors Seneca userid and
replace NAA with your section):
~profName.proflastname/submit 144w2/NAA_p2 <ENTER>
6. Follow the on-screen submission instructions

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